Posts Tagged 'text'

Text scam: keep these things in mind

We have your account information: American 1 wouldn’t call you up and ask you your account information out of the blue. Besides, we have your information already. Usually we ask you to verify your account when you call us – just to make sure you’re who you say you are. That’s to keep your money safe, and to keep thieves from calling up and pretending to be you.

We don’t have a texting program: Some credit unions and banks are notifying their members and customers of transactions or low fund warnings via text. These programs are great, but we don’t have one set up right now. So if you see a text coming from us, it’s not us.

When fraud happens, we use a different method: American 1 does monitor our Visa and debit cards for fraud activity automatically, but the system is a simple phone call that verifies your transactions (“Did you buy such-and-such at this place yesterday?”) and never asks for your card number. Like we mentioned above, we have that info already.

It doesn’t hurt to call us: If you’re ever unsure about someone asking about your financial info, hang up and give us a call to make sure everything’s okay. You never know who’s who, or if a different branch is showing up on your caller ID. So to be safe, just call our toll-free number at (888) 213-2848 and double check everything.

Don’t give out your account info over e-mail, the phone, or anywhere else: That’s the bottom line. Thieves aren’t just using text messages; they could be using e-mail, the phone, even Facebook or Twitter. American 1 doesn’t handle account information, especially account and card numbers, over social networks or e-mail, and we recommend you not share that info with just anyone who asks.

Beware new text scam

The Jackson Citizen Patriot reported on a text messaging scam affecting some of our members and non-members:

People are receiving text messages asking them for banking information, a news release from the sheriff’s office stated.

The messages are sent to mobile phones saying PIN numbers or debit card information have been lost from bank records. The message asks people for banking or debit card information, according to the release.

The text messages started appearing Sunday night, says the report.

Beware of text messaging scams like these, and know that American 1 would never ask you for your account information via text, or for your PIN. That’s personal account information that, chances are, we already have.

In fact, American 1 doesn’t engage in any text messaging program right now. If we ever did (for account updates, say, but not phishing for information), we’d be sure to let you know.

If you did respond to this text message, please let us and the Jackson County Sheriff’s office know.

UPDATE: We had an employee receive the text. Here’s what it read:

American 1 FCU Alert: Your CARD has been DEACTIVATED. Please contact us at 877-733-7240 to RECATIVATE your CARD

She also said it appeared to have come from her own phone, which makes this thing extra tricky.

Read our list of things to keep in mind when it comes to these kinds of fraud schemes.

Find a Co-Op Network ATM via text, GPS



Attention travelers: you can find a Co-Op ATM no matter where you are, thanks to the Co-Op text and GPS ATM locator service. The Co-Op Network provides access to more than 28,000 no-surcharge ATMs throughout the country, and many more worldwide.

You can either text your location to the Co-Op Network service, or download a GPS map to your Garmin, Tom Tom, or other turn-by-turn navigation device. Both of these services are great if you don’t have access to a computer or the Internet.

Visit our ATM Locations page for a full list of American 1 no-surcharge ATMs.


Receive a text message? It’s a scam

We’ve had several members tell us that they have received text messages, supposedly from a local bank, asking for personal information.

As always, ignore these text messages – or report them to the police. Our security officers says “the text messages are a scam and [members] should not call the number that the text is prompting them to call.”

Keep in mind: never give personal information to someone that calls you and asks for it. When you call our branch, we’ll ask you confirmation questions just to make sure it’s you. That’s for your security. But when someone calls or texts and asks for your information, don’t give it to them. When we call, we already have your information.


ScamWatch: beware fraud text messages



We recently received word from another credit union that members are receiving fraud text messages citing “unusual account activity.” These text messages provided an 800 number, where members were asked to verify three pieces of information linked to their account to “restore their credit or debit card.” And then it asks them to enter their 16-digit credit or debit card number.

Folks, this is a scam. Credit unions will not alert you via text message when something is wrong with your account. If you ever receive something like this, be sure to double-check the given phone number against our own: (888) 213-2848 or (517) 787-6510. And please, don’t ever enter your credit or debit card number to just anyone. Check and double-check each request for financial information. It could save you a bundle.


ScamWatch: Protect your cell phone info

One woman changed her habit of how she lists her names on her mobile phone after her handbag was stolen. Her handbag contained her cell phone, credit card, wallet, etc.

Twenty minutes later when she called her husband from a pay phone, telling him what had happened, her husband says “I received your text asking about our PIN number and I’ve replied a little while ago.”

When they rushed down to the bank, the bank staff told them all the money was already withdrawn. The thief had actually used the stolen cell phone to text “hubby” in the contact list and got hold of the pin number. Within 20 minutes he had withdrawn all the money from their bank account.

Moral of the story: Do not disclose the relationship between you and the people in your contact list. Avoid using names like Home, Honey, Hubby, Sweetheart, Dad, Mom, etc. And very importantly, when sensitive info is being asked through texts, CONFIRM by calling back.

Also, when you’re being text by friends or family to meet them somewhere, be sure to call back to confirm that the message came from them. If you don’t reach them, be very careful about going places to meet ‘family and friends’ who text you.


[Our Vice President of IT sent this message along to employees a few mornings ago. A good example of information falling into the wrong hands.]



American 1 Federal Credit Union